The NCAA Final Four – A Weekend to Remember

The NCAA Final Four – A Weekend to Remember

Two weeks ago, I attended the NCAA Final Four basketball tournament in Indianapolis. It was not my first Final Four as I attended previously in 2001 (Minneapolis) and 2010 (Indianapolis). I was able to attend because my undergraduate alma mater, Duke University, qualified and then won its assigned bracket in the South region. As a Duke alum, it was thrilling to watch my team win and to see some old friends I hadn’t seen in a few years.

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Podcast: Pioneering Learning Relationship Management

This week, I’m featuring a podcast from former APUS Chief Operations Officer Dr. Sharon van Wyk and Fidelis Founder and CEO Gunnar Counselman discussing how the organizations are working to enhance student engagement and successful outcomes through their innovative Learning Relationship Management partnership.

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Wally Boston

‘THE END OF COLLEGE: Creating the Future of Learning and the University of Everywhere’ by Kevin Carey

The best non-fiction tells a story rather than provides an analytical narrative. Kevin Carey’s new book, The End of College, weaves a compelling story about innovations in information technology that will disrupt the meritocracy of elite colleges and universities and enable low-cost education for hundreds of millions of people worldwide: “The University of Everywhere.”

Instead of attending traditional institutions, students will access books, lecture videos, and digital learning environments through the Internet.

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Remaking College: The Changing Ecology of Higher Education

Remaking College: The Changing Ecology of Higher Education

Since the 2008 recession, higher education “experts” have surfaced by the thousands. Some hold political office, some are entrepreneurs, some are writers, and some self-qualify simply because they graduated from college and believe their personal perspective is all that matters. Sadly, most of these so-called experts form their opinions based on a narrow view of higher education without examining the broader, more diverse landscape of institutions educating a wide spectrum of students.

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Sweet Briar

Change is Hard but – if Needed – Change before it’s Too Late

Last week’s announcement that Sweet Briar College would close in August came as a shock to many. Some alumnae have organized a fundraising campaign to keep Sweet Briar alive and others are wondering why a college with an $84 million endowment and 700 students had to close while it still had cash in the bank. The board cited an unsustainable enrollment decline as one of the reasons.

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Recalibrating Regulation of Colleges and Universities

Recalibrating Regulation of Colleges and Universities

In the Fall of 2013, a bipartisan group of U.S. Senators (Lamar Alexander, R-Tenn., Barbara Mikulski, D-Md., Richard Burr, R-N.C. and Michael Bennet, D-Colo.) established a task force of college and university presidents to examine federal regulation of higher education and to identify and recommend potential improvements. The task force subsequently examined the process by which higher education rules are developed and implemented and also proposed changes for improvement in that area.

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Educational Attainment: Tracking the Academic Success of Servicemembers and Veterans

Educational Attainment: Tracking the Academic Success of Servicemembers and Veterans

While much has been written about college persistence and retention related to traditional college students (18-22 year-olds matriculating immediately after high school graduation), substantially less has been written about adult students, particularly those whose jobs and family obligations make it difficult to attend college in a traditional face-to-face classroom structure. Many of the published research papers about non-traditional or online student persistence have been single-institution studies, offering little ability to make comparisons between studies because of the lack of common definitions and benchmarks.

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What Stays in Vegas

What Stays in Vegas

Adam Tanner’s new book, What Stays in Vegas: The World of Personal Data – Lifeblood of Big Business – and the End of Privacy as We Know It, is both enlightening and frightening. Tanner, a fellow at the Institute for Quantitative Social Science at Harvard University, has also been a reporter and bureau chief for several news agencies and newspapers.

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The Current and Future State of Military Voluntary Education: Reflections on the CCME 2015 National Symposium

The Current and Future State of Military Voluntary Education: Reflections on the CCME 2015 National Symposium

Jim Sweizer, Vice President of Military, Veterans, and Community College Outreach, American Public University System

The Council of College and Military Educators (CCME), which serves the training and networking needs of military voluntary education professionals, annually hosts a conference for attendees from the Department of Defense (DoD), universities, and members of the Education Service Officer (ESO) community.

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Grade Level: Tracking Online Education in the United States

Grade Level: Tracking Online Education in the United States

The 12th annual report from the Babson Survey Research Group (BSRG) sponsored by the Online Learning Consortium (formerly the Sloan Consortium) that tracks the growth of online education has been released.

This year’s report is notable for several changes. After 10 years of discussing the need for the Department of Education to track online enrollments, the National Center for Educational Statistics has begun to track online enrollments through its IPEDS data collection process.

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