American Public University System and the Defense Acquisition University Partner to Advance Today’s Acquisition Professionals

In early July, I joined Dr. Roy Wood, acting vice president of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU), for a signing ceremony to initiate one of our newest APUS partnerships at their Ft. Belvoir, Virginia, offices. The DAU mission to develop qualified acquisition professionals who deliver and sustain effective and affordable warfighting capabilities fully aligns with our own to educate those who serve, and we’re proud to work with them in this exciting new joint endeavor.

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Are Lawyers Getting Dumber?

Are Lawyers Getting Dumber?

In the Aug. 24, 2015 issue of Bloomberg Businessweek, Natalie Kitroeff discusses the results of the July 2014 bar exam. The National Conference of Bar Examiners (NCBE) creates and scores the multiple choice part of the test used in all states except Louisiana. Last year, those results dropped the most ever in the exam’s 40-plus year history.

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A Benchmark for Making College Affordable – The Rule of 10

A Benchmark for Making College Affordable – The Rule of 10

As part of its ongoing contributions to improving higher education, the Lumina Foundation issued a white paper in August 2015, A Benchmark for Making College Affordable – The Rule of 10. The paper initially references the 45 percent increase in the cost of college over the past decade while the average family income rose only 7 percent over the same period.

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Rich Media in the Online Classroom: An Interview with Drs. Phil Ice and Melissa Layne

Rich Media in the Online Classroom: An Interview with Drs. Phil Ice and Melissa Layne

At American Public University System, we recently completed a successful project to update the peer-reviewed Internet Learning Journal, which focuses on research and advancements in online learning. Our successful incorporation of rich media and interactive elements in the Journal led to a new initiative to utilize the same technology to build out state-of-the-art course applications for a 40-course pilot project to complement our traditional Learning Management System.  

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Trajectories for Digital Technology in Higher Education

Trajectories for Digital Technology in Higher Education

In the July/August issue of Educause Review, Malcom Brown discusses six trajectories for digital technologies in higher education. As he explains, the pace of technology change can be interrupted by many factors, including the acceleration of newer technologies, so trajectories are more descriptive than predictions.

Before discussing these trajectories, Brown sets the context by defining three characteristics of today’s technology utilization in higher education.

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Renovation of Old Buildings Wally Boston AMU

Renovating Older Buildings, Revitalizing Communities

In a recent article about preserving historic building, Julianne Couch explains how renovating existing structures in towns and cities can revitalize the community. The article reminded me of our experience at American Public University System (APUS).

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Revenge of the Philosophy Majors

Revenge of the Philosophy Majors

The Aug. 17, 2015 issue of Forbes features an article by George Anders, whose premise is that brilliant coding and engineering is a given in Silicon Valley corporations but that their real value-add comes from employees who can sell and humanize their products. He writes about two executives with Slack Technologies, Anna Pickard and Stewart Butterfield, who majored in theater and philosophy, respectively.

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The Internet of Things and Big Data Are Only Just Beginning

The Internet of Things and Big Data Are Only Just Beginning

I have discussed the Internet of Things and Big Data in the past. Last week, I saw  the potential for the growth and integration of each, firsthand.

While APUS has operated as an online institution since 1993, technological advances have changed how online classes are taught, and the types offered, during that time. It’s only been in recent years that we have been able to offer more science programs thanks to wider availability of broadband, video compression, and simulations, among other enhancements.

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The Devil is in the Details

The Devil is in the Details

The Wall Street Journal wrote this week, Japan Rethinks Higher Education in Skills Push, Aug. 2, 2015 about Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s funding proposal for Japanese universities, noting that liberal arts would be pushed back in favor of business or vocational programs. The prime minister asked that the 86 nationally-funded universities submit restructuring proposals that either focused on achieving global leadership in scientific research or on vocational training.

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The Glass Cage: Automation and Us

The Glass Cage: Automation and Us

I can’t remember many non-fiction book authors whose multiple tomes have generated as much interest as Nicholas Carr’s information technology related works. Two of his three previous books, The Big Switch and The Shallows, were reviewed by me for this blog. The Glass Cage was published by Carr last year and I finally pulled it off the shelf determined to read it over the holiday weekend.

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