Home Tag "impact of coronavirus on higher education"

Higher Ed 2.0: Scott Galloway’s Reassessment of the Pandemic’s Impact

As I mentioned in a previous post, the May 1 due date for college acceptance decisions seems to have coincided with several notable predications about the impact of the pandemic on changes in higher ed. Earlier this week, I commented on the Adam Weinberg opinion piece in Higher Ed Dive as well as the Brandon Busteed article in Forbes. Concomitant with the other pieces, Professor Scott Galloway’s weekly blog post, “Higher Ed 2.0 (What We Got Right/Wrong),” reviewed his prediction from last year that the pandemic would change higher ed forever in a number of ways.

Saint Francis University Returns to On-Campus Classes This Fall

In April, I published a two-part interview with Father Malachi Van Tassell, T.O.R., President of Saint Francis University, and Dr. Karan Powell, Vice President of Academic Affairs at Saint Francis University. Like many colleges and universities, Saint Francis had cancelled its on-campus classes and converted to online classes for the rest of the semester (read Part I and Part II of the series). Dr. Powell and I spoke recently, and I discovered that Saint Francis elected to return to on-campus courses this semester. I asked her if she and Father Malachi would be willing to update me regarding their preparations for the fall.

Learning Innovation and the Future of Higher Education

Just before traditional campuses sent all of their faculty and students home and transitioned courses to some form of online instruction for the rest of the spring semester, I finished reading Joshua Kim’s and Edward Maloney’s new book, Learning Innovation and the Future of Higher Education. The authors teach and work at traditional universities (Dartmouth and Georgetown) and wrote the book to discuss ways that colleges and universities can better align teaching practices with the science of learning, given the rising cost of education for students and the financial pressures on colleges. Given the acceleration of financial pressures on colleges and their temporary migration to online courses, I have a feeling that the authors have been too busy for a road show to promote their book.

How Should We Measure Financial Solvency for Colleges and Universities?

Inside Higher Ed’s Rick Seltzer writes about two initiatives related to measuring institutional financial health. Mr. Seltzer reports that the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (NC-SARA) voted to continue to use the federal financial composite scores as the primary factor for evaluating whether or not institutions are eligible to be members.

The Making of a Financial Disaster for Higher Education

Much has been written about the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on higher education. At this point in time, most, if not all, colleges and universities have shuttered their campuses and are attempting to continue the semester by teaching online. With the notices to parents (I have two daughters in college) that refunds will be forthcoming for a prorated portion of the semester for room, board, and fees for other services, I became curious about how issuing refunds to students would impact many colleges.