Home Tag "crisis in higher education"

The Crisis in American Higher Education: Evolution and Continuing Disruptions

Over the summer, a friend of mine asked me if I would be a luncheon speaker for a group of retired executives. The group was looking for someone to speak about the Crisis in Higher Education, and he thought I would be the perfect speaker given my two decades of involvement with online higher education. I agreed to speak and thought I would provide an outline of my speech.

How to Explain the Crisis in Higher Education in 40 Minutes – Part 5

Read the entire article here.

Part 4 ended with a discussion about the percentage of students enrolled in online classes in the fall of 2018 as well as the concentration of those enrollments in a small number of institutions.

Thus far, we have seen how the involvement of the federal government in providing financial aid in the form of grants and mostly loans to students led to a dramatic increase in the enrollment of college students after the Second World War.

How to Explain the Crisis in Higher Education in 40 Minutes – Part 4

Read the entire article here.

Part 3 ended with a discussion about The Global Auction published in 2010.

Harvard Business School professor and Innovators Dilemma author Clayton M. Christensen & Henry J. Eyring teamed up to write The Innovative University: Changing the DNA of Higher Education from the Inside Out in 2011. Between 60 and 75 percent of the book discusses the various innovations deployed over the years by two universities, Harvard and Ricks College, now BYU-Idaho.

How to Explain the Crisis in Higher Education in 40 Minutes – Part 3

Read the entire article here.

Part 2 ended with a discussion about the founding of the Sloan Consortium in 1999.

The American Military University (the predecessor organization of the institution I formerly led) mandated the conversion of all its courses to online in 2000. With a proven Learning Management System (LMS) and the growing use of the Internet, AMU’s leadership team believed that it was time to no longer allow courses that were not 100 percent online.

How to Explain the Crisis in Higher Education in 40 Minutes – Part 2

Read the entire article here.

Part 1 ended with a discussion about the 1972 Title IX amendment of the Higher Education Act.

I decided to add a personal reflection about my college experience. I began my freshman year of college at Duke University in the Fall of 1972. I remember seeing signup sheets all over campus for tryouts for new women’s sports teams that Duke was organizing to quickly respond to the recently passed Title IX requirements.