Home Tag "college graduation rates"

The Complicated Issue of Defining College Student “Success”

Over the weekend, tweets from higher ed academics and critics were circulating about a recently published article by Jon Marcus in The Hechinger Report. The article, “Most college students don’t graduate in four years, so colleges and the government count six years as ‘success,’” claimed that colleges have moved the finish line to give themselves credit for success if students graduate in six years. Sometimes, that standard may even be eight years, which is what consumers find reported on the College Scorecard.

Reviewing a Decade of College Spending

Last month the Delta Cost Project released its annual report on college spending, Trends in College Spending 1999-2009: Where Does the Money Come From?  Where Does It Go?  What Does It Buy?  Examining the decade between 1999 and 2009 the report paints a bleak picture of the current state of higher education spending with very small but notable improvements in specific areas. 

Student Attrition

America’s declining college graduation rates have been the subject of many a political speech or hearing lately.  President Obama set a long term goal for his administration to restore America’s prominence in the percentage of its citizens with college degrees.  When you examine the research literature regarding student attrition, persistence, or graduation rates, there are thousands of publications and numerous dissertations written about some aspect of those topics.