Accountability in Assessment: Projections for Higher Education

By Julie Atwood Director of Assessment, American Public University System

The use of assessment in higher education dates back to the earliest learning experiences, but assessment today often refers to a means of evaluating student learning throughout a program or university. Since the 1980s, as a field it has developed to facilitate the self-evaluation of a program, achievement of the school’s mission, or to determine success for a particular area, such as writing.

Nurturing the Entrepreneurial Spirit

By Joe Rice, Director, Eastern Panhandle Technology Innovation Center

The spirit of entrepreneurship doesn’t go away after you launch your company. In fact, many entrepreneurs consider themselves “serial entrepreneurs” as they seek the thrill and excitement of starting a new company. These serial entrepreneurs gather much more satisfaction in starting companies than they do in running them.

Leading the Way: Capitalizing on Disruption to Improve Online Education

By Patricia J. Campbell, Ph.D., Assistant Provost, Vice President at American Public University System

Renowned higher education expert Clayton Christensen has suggested that competency-based education (CBE) is one of today’s major disruptive innovations. Higher education needs to adapt in order to meet the increasingly challenging environment in which the Academy is situated (Weise and Christensen, 2014).

AMU-Hosted Summit Draws International Leaders in Fight against Human Trafficking

By Jeffrey Kuhn, Associate Vice-President, Public Safety and National Security Sectors, American Military University

On November 17-20, American Military University (AMU) hosted Together Let’s Stop Traffick, an international summit aimed at promoting collaboration in the ongoing global fight to end human trafficking. Human trafficking is modern-day slavery and has been referred to as the “human rights issue of our era.”

The Nearly Free University and the Emerging Economy: The Revolution in Higher Education by Charles Hugh Smith

My three greatest interests in higher education are (in order): affordability, student persistence, and technology-enabled education. Given the size of the sector, researchers or authors usually write about one of those topics in a focused or nuanced paper/book. Having read a reference to the above book that appeared to focus on affordability and technology-enabled education, I ordered a copy.