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Internet Learning: An Open Access Journal Documenting Digital Changes in Academics

Open-access journals are scholarly journals that are available online to the reader at no cost.

By Dr. Melissa Layne, Director of Research Methodology and Editor-in-Chief, Internet Learning Journal

Internet Learning is an open access journal published by American Public University System in partnership with the Policy Studies Organization. Since the publication of our inaugural issue in 2012, we continue to provide and promote scholarship that mirrors our digitized world by:

  • Expanding editorial and reviewer boards with highly-regarded experts and visionaries in in the field of online learning
  • Broadening our reader and author audience by disseminating scholarship in traditional paper, online, and kindle versions via Westphalia Press
  • Striving to make research more visible to readers via press releases, research alerts, social media outlets, and professional blogs
  • Utilizing digital publishing tools that promote content marketing, social media engagement, targeting and personalization, conversion rate, and mobile optimization
  • Soliciting high quality articles that tell a story by making use of visualization tools, audio, graphic, video, animation, and simulations
  • Encouraging authors to self-promote their research through academic-related social networks

In a few short years, Internet Learning has doubled the size of its reviewer board, the members of which come from diverse backgrounds ranging from faculty to academic leaders, published authors, editors, graphic designers, and entrepreneurs.

Scholarly Research: The Paths to Answering Complex Questions

By Elena Mastors, Dean of Applied Research

When faced with a complex question for which we don’t have answers, we often turn to research.  In order to discover the best answers, it’s critical that we look at how we approach research—especially as scholars.

In academia, class research primarily involves consulting scholarly sources, such as books and peer-reviewed articles, to find answers on a variety of topics.

Nature and Needs of Higher Education

When reading research reports, I have a habit of noting specific citations if they interest me.  Whether I subsequently access the original source depends on how much time I have and whether the topic is relevant to an article or paper that I am writing.   I don’t retrieve older source documents as often as newer ones, since much of my writing involves online learning, a field that is evolving almost as quickly as the technology that supports it changes. 

APUS Green Initiatives

It has been a little while since I’ve provided an update on American Public University System’s (APUS) sustainability efforts.  There seems no better time to do so than Earth Day.  Despite my lack of updates on this blog, the APUS Sustainability Committee has been working diligently and partnering with other groups on campus to promote sustainability and make APUS a greener place to work and learn. 

Honoring the Life of a True American Hero

Frank  Buckles, the last living World War I Doughboy, died early Sunday morning at the age of 110.  Born on February 1, 1901 in Bethany, Missouri, Buckles’ life spanned one of the most turbulent, exciting, and eventful times in history.  A resident of Charles Town, West Virginia where American Public University System (APUS) is headquartered, Buckles was well-known within the local community as well as nationally. 

The Disappearing Art of the Handwritten Note

I was going through some old files the other day and stumbled across a handwritten note from a former colleague of mine.  Reading the note again triggered memories about that particular time of my life and my career.  Later, I thought about other notes I had received over the years and how the art of the handwritten note seems to be disappearing.

The Ninth Anniversary of 9/11

Tomorrow is the ninth anniversary of 9/11.  Most of us can remember where we were and what we were doing the moment we heard about the planes flying into the World Trade Center buildings and the Pentagon.    Unlike normal days where we go about our business, many of us knew our lives would be changed forever. 

Welcome

The end of August, first of September represents the start of the traditional fall semester at most colleges and universities.  Freshmen arrive with the excitement of attending a new school and meeting lots of new friends.  Returning students arrive with tales of summer’s experiences and a spirit of renewal for their academic quest.  The campus has been spruced up with summer maintenance projects, some of which have been completed just days, or even hours, before the first freshmen arrived.

The World’s Response to the Situation in Haiti

The world’s response to the situation in Haiti over the next few days will be critical in finding survivors, helping the injured, and providing food, water, and other supplies to a nation devastated by the disastrous earthquake which hit that country on January 12th.  We know that we will have students and faculty members deployed to Haiti as members of the Marines, Coast Guard, Navy, Army, Air Force, emergency and disaster rescue teams from states, counties, and municipalities, United Nations peacekeeping troops, and other agencies that have yet to be named in the press.