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Revenge of the Philosophy Majors

The Aug. 17, 2015 issue of Forbes features an article by George Anders, whose premise is that brilliant coding and engineering is a given in Silicon Valley corporations but that their real value-add comes from employees who can sell and humanize their products. He writes about two executives with Slack Technologies, Anna Pickard and Stewart Butterfield, who majored in theater and philosophy, respectively.

Graduation Gap Wider than Enrollment Gap for the Poor

Susan Dynarski’s June 2 article in The New York Times elicited more than a few tweets. Dr. Dynarski, a professor of education, public policy and economics at the University of Michigan, wrote about a project called the Education Longitudinal Study that began tracking 15,000 high school sophomores in 2002. Last month, the researchers updated their educational attainment data for those sophomores and issued a report.

A Leader’s Perspective

Dr. Wally Boston was invited by The Education Alliance, a non-profit that works to improve K-12 education in the state of West Virginia, to participate in: EDTalks: Connecting Education, Jobs and Our Future event.

The EDTalks event featured three speakers: the Honorable Joe Manchin, III, United States Senator, Erin Sponaugle, 2014 West Virginia Teacher of the Year, and Dr.

The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy

It may have been the subtitle that drew my attention to Bruce Katz’ and Jennifer Bradley’s book or it may have been a reference to the text in an article that I read. Regardless, the book opened my eyes to the increasingly important role of metros and cities in our national economic recovery. According to the authors, the nation’s top 100 metropolitan areas occupy 12 percent of the U.S.

Grading the American Education System and Federal Education Policy

Last month, the Council on Foreign Relations’ (CFR) Renewing America initiative published a progress report and scorecard on federal education policy, providing striking comparisons between the US system and those found in other developed nations.  The report sheds light on the grimmest details of federal education policy and the shortcomings that led to the nation’s decline in worldwide educational rankings. 

Some Thoughts on Inside Higher Ed’s 2013 Survey of Parents

This article is part 2 of a 2 part series reviewing the results of Inside Higher Ed’s most recently-released surveys.  The first survey took the pulse of higher education from the perspective of college and university presidents.  The second survey asked largely similar questions of parents of students in grades 5 through 12.  While both offer insightful glimpses into the ways in which each group views the current trends in online education, there are notable differences in how respondents of the two surveys view the higher educational situation in America today.