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Wally Boston

Wally Boston
Dr. Wallace E. Boston was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of American Public University System (APUS) and its parent company, American Public Education, Inc. (APEI) in July 2004. He joined APUS as its Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 2002. In September 2019, Dr. Boston retired as CEO of APEI and retired as APUS President in August 2020. Dr. Boston guided APUS through its successful initial accreditation with the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association in 2006 and ten-year reaccreditation in 2011. In November 2007, he led APEI to an initial public offering on the NASDAQ Exchange. For four years from 2009 through 2012, APEI was ranked in Forbes' Top 10 list of America's Best Small Public Companies. During his tenure as president, APUS grew to over 85,000 students, 200 degree and certificate programs, and approximately 100,000 alumni. While serving as APEI CEO and APUS President, Dr. Boston was a board member of APEI, APUS, Hondros College of Nursing, and Fidelis, Inc. Dr. Boston continues to serve as a member of the Board of Advisors of the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA), a member of the Board of Overseers of the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, and as a member of the board of New Horizons Worldwide. He has authored and co-authored papers on the topic of online post-secondary student retention, and is a frequent speaker on the impact of technology on higher education. Dr. Boston is a past Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the McDonogh School, a private K-12 school in Baltimore. In his career prior to APEI and APUS, Dr. Boston served as either CFO, COO, or CEO of Meridian Healthcare, Manor Healthcare, Neighborcare Pharmacies, and Sun Healthcare Group. Dr. Boston is a Certified Public Accountant, Certified Management Accountant, and Chartered Global Management Accountant. He earned an A.B. degree in History from Duke University, an MBA in Marketing and Accounting from Tulane University’s Freeman School of Business Administration, and a Doctorate in Higher Education Management from the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education. In 2008, the Board of Trustees of APUS awarded him a Doctorate in Business Administration, honoris causa, and, in April 2017, also bestowed him with the title President Emeritus. In August 2020, the Board of Trustees of APUS appointed him Trustee Emeritus. In November 2020, the Board of Trustees announced that the APUS School of Business would be renamed the Dr. Wallace E Boston School of Business in recognition of Dr. Boston's service to the university. Dr. Boston lives with his family in Austin, Texas.

Should Elite Schools Be Embarrassed About How Few Students They Educate?

In last week’s Washington Post, former Chronicle of Education Editor Jeff Selingo wrote an opinion piece about Harvard and its peers and their continued low admission rates. According to Mr. Selingo, some of these institutions’ alums may view the low, single-digit admissions rates as a confirmation of their alma maters’ popularity and prestige. He believes that these numbers are signs of institutional failure.

Walking Around South Austin: Its Architectural and Cultural Diversity

I haven’t lived inside the city limits of a big city since attending grad school in New Orleans. Accustomed to life in the suburbs over the past four decades, I acquiesced to the idea of living in South Austin post-retirement.

Why Don’t More Colleges and Universities Use Their LMS as a True Learning Management System?

After reading and writing about Steven Mintz’s Inside Higher Ed article questioning whether or not educational technology will ever live up to its promise, I thought about the workhorse software that most colleges and universities use: the Learning Management System (LMS).

AI and the Productivity J-Curve – Will We See the Same in Education?

In a recently published article in The Wall Street Journal, reporter Angus Loten writes about the pandemic-induced acceleration of artificial intelligence (AI) implementations by businesses, with some industries pulling ahead of others.

Are Expenditures for EdTech in K-12 Education Wasteful?

In a recently published EdSurge article, senior reporter Emily Tate reports that the edtech industry in the U.S. is massive. In 2020, edtech startups and existing companies raised $2.2 billion from investors. Despite the continuing investment of capital in the industry, no one knows what the aggregate industry revenues are.

Should Colleges Be Able to Determine Who They Admit?

The sequels continue as responses come in to the now-famous Atlantic article by Caitlin Flanagan about independent school graduates comprising a higher percentage of elite college admissions than their overall share of high school graduates would indicate.

Priced Out: What a College Education Is Costing America

In a recently published research paper, “Priced Out: What College Costs America,” National Association of Scholars Research Fellow Neetu Arnold examines three issues in U.S. higher education: inflated tuition, continuously expanding administrative positions, and increasing levels of student debt. She also shows how they join and reinforce each other to the detriment of America.

AI: What Will It Mean for American Education Tomorrow?

Last month, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) issued a report about the potential impact of artificial intelligence (AI) on education. Authored by Dirk Van Damme, Head of the OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation, the report begins by mentioning the collapse of the financial system in 2008, the pandemic, and climate change. It also states that the most disruptive change in the 21st century will be AI.

Why Is It So Difficult to Implement Educational Technology?

In his recently published blog article for Inside Higher Ed, University of Texas professor Steven Mintz asks a pivotal question: “Can educational technology ever live up to its promise?”

Reasons for College Admissions: “It’s the Economics, Stupid!”

“It’s the economy, stupid!” was Bill Clinton strategist James Carville’s directive to keep his presidential campaign staffers on message during his successful 1992 run for the presidency. While I chose not to use a paraphrase of that slogan in my recent post about Caitlin Flanagan’s article stating that private schools in the U.S. have become obscene, perhaps I should have.