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Wally Boston

Wally Boston
Dr. Wallace E. Boston was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer of American Public University System (APUS) and its parent company, American Public Education, Inc. (APEI) in July 2004. He joined APUS as its Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in 2002. In September 2019, Dr. Boston retired as CEO of APEI and retired as APUS President in August 2020. Dr. Boston guided APUS through its successful initial accreditation with the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association in 2006 and ten-year reaccreditation in 2011. In November 2007, he led APEI to an initial public offering on the NASDAQ Exchange. For four years from 2009 through 2012, APEI was ranked in Forbes' Top 10 list of America's Best Small Public Companies. During his tenure as president, APUS grew to over 85,000 students, 200 degree and certificate programs, and approximately 100,000 alumni. While serving as APEI CEO and APUS President, Dr. Boston was a board member of APEI, APUS, Hondros College of Nursing, and Fidelis, Inc. Dr. Boston continues to serve as a member of the Board of Advisors of the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment (NILOA), a member of the Board of Overseers of the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, and as a member of the board of New Horizons Worldwide. He has authored and co-authored papers on the topic of online post-secondary student retention, and is a frequent speaker on the impact of technology on higher education. Dr. Boston is a past Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the McDonogh School, a private K-12 school in Baltimore. In his career prior to APEI and APUS, Dr. Boston served as either CFO, COO, or CEO of Meridian Healthcare, Manor Healthcare, Neighborcare Pharmacies, and Sun Healthcare Group. Dr. Boston is a Certified Public Accountant, Certified Management Accountant, and Chartered Global Management Accountant. He earned an A.B. degree in History from Duke University, an MBA in Marketing and Accounting from Tulane University’s Freeman School of Business Administration, and a Doctorate in Higher Education Management from the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education. In 2008, the Board of Trustees of APUS awarded him a Doctorate in Business Administration, honoris causa, and, in April 2017, also bestowed him with the title President Emeritus. In August 2020, the Board of Trustees of APUS appointed him Trustee Emeritus. In November 2020, the Board of Trustees announced that the APUS School of Business would be renamed the Dr. Wallace E Boston School of Business in recognition of Dr. Boston's service to the university. Dr. Boston lives with his family in Austin, Texas.

College Tuition: What’s A Reasonable Amount to Borrow?

It’s important to have affordable college options. It’s equally important for everyone who’s capable of completing college to be able to attend college. It’s also natural based on the first two sentences to ask, “What should college tuition cost?”

Graduate School Loans: An Overview of Problems and Solutions

I am grateful to the Wall Street Journal education reporters for calling my attention to the fact that median debt and median earnings data are available for graduate programs at many schools. The articles that they published, “Financially Hobbled for Life: The Elite Master’s Degrees that Don’t Pay Off” and “Is a Graduate Degree Worth the Debt?,” triggered my reviews of their reporting tool and the College Scorecard’s updated dataset used for their data reporting.

Does The Medical Profession Warrant High Student Debt?

I have heard for years that physicians borrow a lot of money to attend medical school. I have also heard that high debt levels are okay because medical doctors make enough money to repay their student loans. Based on the data reported by the Wall Street Journal, I’m not so sure.

More Analysis of Law School Debt and Earnings Data

After reviewing and writing about the data available for law school graduates in the Wall Street Journal tool, I planned to review the data for medical school graduates and write a similar report. While reviewing the medical school data, I paused when I reached the colleges whose names begin with the letter “D.” At that point, I realized that one of my alma maters, Duke University, was not listed.

Evaluating Grad Students’ ROI – Are Law Schools Failing?

Whether or not you believe that the median debt to median earnings ratio presented by the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is the only way to review the return on education investment, the graphic representation of law schools’ debt to earnings ratio below is sickening.

The Master’s Degree and Checking ROI after Student Graduation

As a follow-up to my recent post about graduates from master’s degree programs and their related debt and post-graduation income, I decided to dive more deeply into the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) database.

Incurring Debt for Master’s Degrees – Where Is It Working?

On July 8, the Wall Street Journal (WSJ) published Melissa Korn’s and Andrea Fuller’s article, “Financially Hobbled for ‘Life’: The Elite Master’s Degrees That Don’t Pay Off.” The article opened with the example of recent film program graduates of Columbia University who took out federal loans and had a median debt of $181,000. If the debt load incurred for their degrees wasn’t bad enough, Ms. Korn and Ms. Fuller reported that two years after graduation, half of those student loan borrower graduates were making less than $30,000 a year.

Professor Katy Milkman: The Solutions to Behavioral Change

I read about behavioral scientist and Wharton professor Dr. Katy Milkman in the University of Pennsylvania’s alumni magazine, The Pennsylvania Gazette. The article written by Joann Greco piqued my interest about Milkman’s book, "How to Change: The Science of Getting from Where You Are to Where You Want to Be" so much that I read it as soon as it arrived.

Student Persistence: A Decline for Spring 2021 Enrollments?

The National Student Clearinghouse (NSC) provides enrollment reporting from colleges and universities that educate approximately 97% of all college students. Several times a year, they issue reports utilizing the aggregated data submitted by its institutional members. Last week, the NSC issued a report about college student persistence that looks at the enrollment and re-enrollment data from the Fall 2019 first-time freshmen.

The Future of Business Education and the Value of MOOCs

One of the chapters in Jason Wingard and Christine Farrugia’s book, "The Great Skills Gap: Optimizing Talent for the Future of Work," is “The Future of Business Education.” Written by Anne Trumbore, Executive Director, Digital and Open Enrollment, Executive Education – Lifelong Learning at The Darden School at the University of Virginia and formerly at The Wharton School, the article focuses on results from a study investigating in-course behaviors as related to post-course career advancement.