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Personalization and Respect Central to Creating Value for Non-Traditional Students

Guest Post: Personalization and Respect Central to Creating Value for Non-Traditional Students

APUS is dedicated to implementing best practices and programs for our students that support their academic and personal success.  In this guest post, Caroline Simpson, APUS assistant provost of student services, shares her thoughts on personalization of service, transparency of options, and various support practice benefits. 

*Snippet from Evolllution

Non-traditional students expect a level of service from institutions that is, frankly, foreign to many higher education leaders.

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Sweet Briar

Change is Hard but – if Needed – Change before it’s Too Late

Last week’s announcement that Sweet Briar College would close in August came as a shock to many. Some alumnae have organized a fundraising campaign to keep Sweet Briar alive and others are wondering why a college with an $84 million endowment and 700 students had to close while it still had cash in the bank. The board cited an unsustainable enrollment decline as one of the reasons.

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Educational Attainment: Tracking the Academic Success of Servicemembers and Veterans

Educational Attainment: Tracking the Academic Success of Servicemembers and Veterans

While much has been written about college persistence and retention related to traditional college students (18-22 year-olds matriculating immediately after high school graduation), substantially less has been written about adult students, particularly those whose jobs and family obligations make it difficult to attend college in a traditional face-to-face classroom structure. Many of the published research papers about non-traditional or online student persistence have been single-institution studies, offering little ability to make comparisons between studies because of the lack of common definitions and benchmarks.

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The Summit for Online Leadership and Strategy

The Summit for Online Leadership and Strategy

Last week, I attended the University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) and American Council on Education (ACE) Summit for Online Leadership and Strategy in San Antonio. Less than two years ago, I was asked to serve on the UPCEA Center for Online Leadership and Strategy Advisory Council. Part of the Center’s role was to plan the first summit that took place in San Diego last year.

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Exploring Institution-to-Institution Student Swirling Patterns

On October 30, my colleagues Dr. Phil Ice, vice president of research and development, Dr. Melissa Layne, director of research methodology, and I presented a research paper at the Online Learning Consortium (formerly Sloan Consortium) annual conference in Orlando, FL. The research was conducted utilizing data submitted to the National Student Clearinghouse as well as the outcomes and analysis of the Clearinghouse data as compared to our data.

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Liberal Arts

Defending the Liberal Arts

At a recent conference entitled “What is Liberal Education For?,” scholars gathered at St. John’s College in Santa Fe, New Mexico to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the establishment of its Santa Fe campus as well as to continue the debate about the merits of a wide, knowledge-encompassing degree versus something more practical and focused.

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Tracking Key Education Trends on a Late Summer Day

By Jeffrey McCafferty, Associate Vice President, Strategic Planning at the American Public University System

Late summer and early autumn is one of my favorite times to visit New York City. The weather is warm, people are bustling, and there is a sense of starting anew as summer vacations have concluded and all are back to work.

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Online Disruption, MOOC Mania, and Change in Higher Education – How Crazy (or Bad) Will it Get?

(keynote delivered at the Distance Learning Administration Conference on June 5, 2013)

I began writing this speech nearly three months ago.  A week and a half ago, I wrapped it up and thought I had better run through it one last time in case any new educational technology had been released that I needed to discuss today. 

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Pilot Program Forces Discussion of Online Learning, MOOCs, Student Retention, and the Future of Higher Education

Earlier this week, the California State University System (CSU) announced an online pilot program with Udacity, a for-profit provider of MOOCs (Massively Open Online Courses).  Udacity will provide a remedial algebra course, a college level algebra course, and a statistics course as part of the pilot that will initially be limited to 300 students at San Jose State University and several local community colleges. 

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Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education

Ithaka S+R recently published a report funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and titled, “Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education.”  I have written extensively on this blog about the economic constraints facing institutions of higher education, issues of student persistence and retention, and the litany of other issues daunting the American higher education system today. 

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