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Graduation Gap Wider than Enrollment Gap for the Poor

Graduation Gap Wider than Enrollment Gap for the Poor

Susan Dynarski’s June 2 article in The New York Times elicited more than a few tweets. Dr. Dynarski, a professor of education, public policy and economics at the University of Michigan, wrote about a project called the Education Longitudinal Study that began tracking 15,000 high school sophomores in 2002. Last month, the researchers updated their educational attainment data for those sophomores and issued a report.

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Sweet Briar

Change is Hard but – if Needed – Change before it’s Too Late

Last week’s announcement that Sweet Briar College would close in August came as a shock to many. Some alumnae have organized a fundraising campaign to keep Sweet Briar alive and others are wondering why a college with an $84 million endowment and 700 students had to close while it still had cash in the bank. The board cited an unsustainable enrollment decline as one of the reasons.

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The Current and Future State of Military Voluntary Education: Reflections on the CCME 2015 National Symposium

The Current and Future State of Military Voluntary Education: Reflections on the CCME 2015 National Symposium

Jim Sweizer, Vice President of Military, Veterans, and Community College Outreach, American Public University System

The Council of College and Military Educators (CCME), which serves the training and networking needs of military voluntary education professionals, annually hosts a conference for attendees from the Department of Defense (DoD), universities, and members of the Education Service Officer (ESO) community.

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State Public Tuition Rate Legislation Creates New Education Options for Veterans

State Public Tuition Rate Legislation Creates New Education Options for Veterans

Guest Post by George M. Vukovich, Director, Veterans Relations at American Public University System

A recent article on Money.com, “Why Veterans Will Soon Save Thousands on College,” provides promising information for veterans and their family members as they transition from the military environment to civilian life, college and beyond.

As a retired Marine, and advocate for veterans achieving higher education success, I truly appreciate the congressional effort to enact new legislation to assist veterans with immediate in-state residency standing for higher education tuition purposes.

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Long-Term Planning Necessary for Financial Stability

Stories about the financial challenges faced by higher education institutions are common and point to the need for boards and administration to adopt an approach to financial planning that ensures long-term stability. In the March 24 edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education, Mark Keierleber writes about a number of smaller colleges that are adjusting to lower enrollments and the lagging economic recovery in “Financially Strapped Colleges Grow More Vulnerable.”

The article features a story about Ashland University, which borrowed money to build a recreation center, an education building, and an addition to its science center.

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“The Rising Cost of Not Going to College” – Food for Thought

 Pew Research Center has just published a compelling report, “The Rising Cost of Not Going to College.” Based on a nationwide study of 2,000+ adults supplemented by recent data from the U.S. Census Bureau, Pew found that on almost every measure of economic and career attainment, Millenials (adults between the ages of 25 to 32) with a college degree outperform their counterparts with less education.

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The Future of Financing College

Sallie Mae Annual Report

In July, 2013, Sallie Mae released its annual report, “How America Pays for College.” Ipsos Public Affairs conducted the survey, which focuses on undergraduate students, ages 18 to 24 years old. Half of the survey population were enrolled students; the other half included parents of enrolled undergraduate students. The most recent edition of the report examines how Americans paid for college for the 2012-13 academic year, most likely relevant only for “traditional” students (18-24 year olds attending college full-time after high school graduation).A report that focuses on non-traditional college students’ funding of college would be of interest as well.

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Online Disruption, MOOC Mania, and Change in Higher Education – How Crazy (or Bad) Will it Get?

(keynote delivered at the Distance Learning Administration Conference on June 5, 2013)

I began writing this speech nearly three months ago.  A week and a half ago, I wrapped it up and thought I had better run through it one last time in case any new educational technology had been released that I needed to discuss today. 

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Considering the Rising Cost of College and Administrative Bloat

During the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, fewer articles about higher education are published, primarily because colleges and universities are closed and faculty, students, and administrators are not around.  On December 28, 2012, however, The Wall Street Journal published an article entitled “Deans List: Hiring Spree Fattens College Bureaucracy- and Tuition.”  The article doesn’t appear to have been picked up in too many other places. 

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What to Make of All the Rapid Innovations in Higher Education?

I was a panel participant at a conference last Thursday in Washington, DC.  The conference was sponsored by the American Enterprise Institute and was called Stretching the Higher Education Dollar.  The five panels that were convened included:  The Case for Reform, Opportunities and Obstacles at Existing Institutions, Unbundling College Degrees in Theory and Practice, College in Pieces: Cost Effective Approaches to Student Services and Credentialing, and Implications for State and Federal Policy. 

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