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Dr. Wally Boston

A Leader’s Perspective

Dr. Wally Boston was invited by The Education Alliance, a non-profit that works to improve K-12 education in the state of West Virginia, to participate in: EDTalks: Connecting Education, Jobs and Our Future event.

The EDTalks event featured three speakers: the Honorable Joe Manchin, III, United States Senator, Erin Sponaugle, 2014 West Virginia Teacher of the Year, and Dr.

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Data Ubiquity May One Day Revolutionize Education

By: Sebastián R. Díaz, Ph.D., J.D., AVP Marketing Analytics, American Public University System

A great concern I have regarding the education of my young daughters is that my wife and I are trying to prepare them for careers and social contexts that might not yet exist—that we can’t fully anticipate. This concern extends well beyond typical finger-pointing at public schools.

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Grading the American Education System and Federal Education Policy

Last month, the Council on Foreign Relations’ (CFR) Renewing America initiative published a progress report and scorecard on federal education policy, providing striking comparisons between the US system and those found in other developed nations.  The report sheds light on the grimmest details of federal education policy and the shortcomings that led to the nation’s decline in worldwide educational rankings. 

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Preparing K-12 Students for Post K-12 Years

Benjamin Franklin once said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”  As an educator, I believe Mr. Franklin’s statement is accurate.  Recently, however, an international ranking of educational success found that despite its role as a global superpower, the United States lags behind other countries.  Top performers include Hong Kong, Canada, Taiwan, Estonia, Japan, and Korea. 

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Why Private Schools are Dying Out

On May 16, 2013, The Atlantic published an article written by Chester Finn, titled “Why Private Schools Are Dying Out.” Finn explores private schools in America and why they’re “dying out.”  While most of the article discusses the situation as it applies to private schools, the author also writes that non-elite, private colleges are also burdened with similar challenges, namely needing to heavily discount tuition in order to attract students.

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Revisiting No Child Left Behind

The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, which received bipartisan support for its passage in 2001, requires that states implement a variety of assessment mechanisms for students and teachers in order to qualify for federal education funding.  This federal act does not establish criteria to which all states must adhere; the means of assessment are left to each state to implement as it sees fit. 

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Education Innovation Summit 2011

This past week, I was invited to participate on a panel at the Education Innovation Summit organized by ASU SkySong (affiliated with Arizona State University) and NeXtAdvisors. The goal of the summit’s organizers is to “’curate’ an environment that provides the right mix of wild-eyed education entrepreneurs, value added investors, not-for-profit leaders, progressive policy makers, academic thought leaders, and forward leaning foundations, philanthropists and industry executives.” Based on the attendees that I met as well as my fellow presenters and panelists, I believe that the organizers hit their mark.

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Pick Books You Like

I read an article by Motoko Rich in the August 29, 2009 issue of The New York Times that talks about the future of reading.  Rich writes about Lorrie McNeill, a middle school teacher in Jonesboro, Georgia who last fall turned over the reading assignments for her seventh and eighth graders to the students themselves.

Rich states that the approach, called reading workshop, is catching on throughout America’s public schools as a way to teach students how to enjoy reading rather than forcing them to read traditional tomes such as Toni Morrison’s  Beloved or Harper Lee‘s To Kill a Mockingbird, a selection that McNeill used to require her students to read. 

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Characteristics of the Class of 2020

Whenever I can find a good book or research paper on the topic of distance education, I will usually obtain a copy in order to see if there’s a trend or idea that is worth noting or pursuing.  For a few weeks, I had noted the ad in The Chronicle of Higher Education touting their new report, “The College of 2020:  Students.”  I had to pay for the report, so I’m sure that the Chronicle wouldn’t like it if I provided a blow-by-blow description of its contents. 

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The Economic Benefits of Closing the Achievement Gap in American Schools

McKinsey & Company released a report in April of this year titled, “The Economic Impact of the Achievement Gap in America’s Schools.”  The report identifies four aspects of the achievement gap in American schools: the international achievement gap, the racial achievement gap, the income achievement gap, and system-based achievement gaps.  The findings in the report are striking in their sense of urgency and are worth discussing.

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