Archive | Economy

Measuring Postcollege Workforce Outcomes

The importance of data and assessment in higher education is well-known by astute college and university leaders. Technology has advanced in a way that allows institutions to more effectively gather and analyze data in order to improve the student

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Grading the American Education System and Federal Education Policy

Last month, the Council on Foreign Relations’ (CFR) Renewing America initiative published a progress report and scorecard on federal education policy, providing striking comparisons between the US system and those found in other developed nations.  The report sheds light on the grimmest details of federal education policy and the shortcomings that led to the nation’s decline in worldwide educational rankings. 

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Online Disruption, MOOC Mania, and Change in Higher Education – How Crazy (or Bad) Will it Get?

(keynote delivered at the Distance Learning Administration Conference on June 5, 2013)

I began writing this speech nearly three months ago.  A week and a half ago, I wrapped it up and thought I had better run through it one last time in case any new educational technology had been released that I needed to discuss today. 

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Some Thoughts on Inside Higher Ed’s 2013 Survey of Parents

This article is part 2 of a 2 part series reviewing the results of Inside Higher Ed’s most recently-released surveys.  The first survey took the pulse of higher education from the perspective of college and university presidents.  The second survey asked largely similar questions of parents of students in grades 5 through 12.  While both offer insightful glimpses into the ways in which each group views the current trends in online education, there are notable differences in how respondents of the two surveys view the higher educational situation in America today.

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Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education

Ithaka S+R recently published a report funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and titled, “Barriers to Adoption of Online Learning Systems in U.S. Higher Education.”  I have written extensively on this blog about the economic constraints facing institutions of higher education, issues of student persistence and retention, and the litany of other issues daunting the American higher education system today. 

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Aon and Wounded Warrior Project Salute America’s Wounded Warriors

The state of the economy is a well-known story these days and the unemployment rate is just one indicator of the trouble.  Unemployment rates linger around 8.3 percent (as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics [BLS] on March 9 for February 2012).  The number of long-term unemployed (classified as those unemployed for 27 weeks or more) remained unchanged in February, hovering at 5.4 million people (approximately 43 percent of the total unemployed). 

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Alternative Certification – A Good Idea?

I have read three articles in the last three days about alternatives to earning a college degree, primarily through certification of one kind or another.

The first article, from The Chronicle of Higher Education, discusses the concept of “badges” that are awarded by various websites, training companies, individuals, etc. The concept is that the badge is relatively easy to earn (to keep the learner motivated and engaged) and indicates that they have achieved a certain skill level or learning competency. 

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Why Government Should Engage the Private Sector in the Higher Education Discussion

In the past several years, online higher education has come under increased scrutiny by the federal government and policymakers.  As a relatively new trend, online education has been closely examined by some, not so closely examined by others, and has a number of critics.  In a recent report called “Odd Man Out: How Government Supports Private-Sector Innovation, Except in Education,” published by the American Enterprise Institute, author John Bailey notes that an acute lack of support and engagement from government agencies to the private sector in education is not only out of sync with other public-private enterprises, it is counterproductive in attempting to reform higher education. 

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Understanding the Real Cost of a Bachelor’s Degree

The October 2011 issue of American Enterprise Institute for Public Policy Research’s (AEI) Education Outlook included an interesting analysis of the total cost of a bachelor’s degree titled, “Cheap for Whom?:   How Much Higher Education Costs Taxpayers.”  The authors, Mark Schneider and Jorge Klor de Alva, go beyond a surface analysis of tuition rates, student fees, and books. 

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