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Would Closing Business Schools Make the World a Better Place?

Would Closing Business Schools Make the World a Better Place?

Would closing business schools save the humanities? Dr. William Major thinks so. Dr. Major is a professor of English at Hillyer College at the University of Hartford. In an interesting essay published in the July 28 issue of Inside Higher Ed titled “Close Business Schools/Save the Humanities,” he suggests that closing all the business schools (“B-schools”) would save the humanities, save schools money, and make the world a better place.

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Milken Penn GSE Education Business Plan Competition and the Innovators Changing the Landscape of Education

Over the past two days, I attended the 2014 Milken Penn GSE Education Business Plan Competition and Conference at the University of Pennsylvania. The Milken Family Foundation awards an overall first prize of $25,000 and a second prize of $15,000 for distinguished innovations to the way we improve education and learning outcomes throughout society. In its fifth year, the conference has steadily grown in the number and quality of business plans presented.

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Long-Term Planning Necessary for Financial Stability

Stories about the financial challenges faced by higher education institutions are common and point to the need for boards and administration to adopt an approach to financial planning that ensures long-term stability. In the March 24 edition of The Chronicle of Higher Education, Mark Keierleber writes about a number of smaller colleges that are adjusting to lower enrollments and the lagging economic recovery in “Financially Strapped Colleges Grow More Vulnerable.”

The article features a story about Ashland University, which borrowed money to build a recreation center, an education building, and an addition to its science center.

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Checklist for Change: Making American Higher Education a Sustainable Enterprise by Robert Zemsky

When I was a doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education, Bob Zemsky constantly reminded my classmates and me of two important things to remember when writing research papers or dissertations. The first was to show the reader the evidence; making statements or conclusions based on flimsy evidence was not a pathway toward graduation or a means of building a successful academic career post graduation.

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Measuring Postcollege Workforce Outcomes

The importance of data and assessment in higher education is well-known by astute college and university leaders. Technology has advanced in a way that allows institutions to more effectively gather and analyze data in order to improve the student

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The Denial Bubble in Higher Education

Last month, Academic Impressions released a report titled

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Online Disruption, MOOC Mania, and Change in Higher Education – How Crazy (or Bad) Will it Get?

(keynote delivered at the Distance Learning Administration Conference on June 5, 2013)

I began writing this speech nearly three months ago.  A week and a half ago, I wrapped it up and thought I had better run through it one last time in case any new educational technology had been released that I needed to discuss today. 

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College (Un)Bound by Jeffrey J. Selingo

As a writer, editor, and now Editor-at-Large for The Chronicle of Higher Education, Jeff Selingo has observed and written about higher education for more than 15 years.  My assessment of his observations noted in his book, College (Un)Bound: The Future of Higher Education and What it Means for Students,  is not unlike a statistician analyzing a very large dataset where every independent variable is technically significant. 

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Education Innovation: Fad or Burgeoning Industry?

I had the pleasure of attending last week’s Education Innovation Summit 2013 in Phoenix.  Co-sponsored by Arizona State University (ASU) and GSV Advisors, this year’s event was the fourth and the largest by far.  Because of my role in online education at American Public University System (APUS), I have been a member of the ASU/GSV advisory board and have attended all four conferences. 

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Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States

For the last ten years The Sloan Consortium has been publishing the results of their annual survey about online learning in the United States.  This year’s edition, “Changing Course: Ten Years of Tracking Online Education in the United States,” contains some noteworthy information.  Published in partnership with Pearson and The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, this year’s survey focuses a significant amount of attention on MOOCs.

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